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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
. back in 2003, i got medicaid payments by the government to help the state's struggling with their medicaid costs. $20 billion will able to spread across the states to help them because they were unable to meet the rising costs. in 2017, they're going to have a larger share of the costs. we need that is taken care of. they did not know what the cost was. they put a number in as a place holder and it looked like i was doing something for my state when i wasn't. i was trying to get it for all the states. that is what happened. i wanted to get it knocked out -- if people wanted an opt out. the supreme court gave that. this got used against me as though i was trying to do something i should not have. i was not. the interesting thing is i was asked to do this by the nebraska governor. i did not get a thank you from another governor, who was from another state. >> during that time, you experienced the radio talk-show host circuit and the cable tv circuit. what was that time like and what do you think the echo chamber in american politics today does? >> it is a difficult thing
government ends up taking it is important not to take guns out of the hands of hunters or fishermen. >> peter doosey, thank you very much. >> the fiscal cliff is looming and now the president has gone home for the holidays and left for hawaii without a deal in place. with nine days left now, is it too late? remember the house budget committee marcia blackburn joins us now. congressman thank you for joining us. >> sure. >> before we get underway, i would love to play for you. play for you right now the president's words just before he departed on his hawaii vacation. here he is. >> so as we leave town for a few days to be with our families for the holidays, i hope it gives everybody some perspective. everybody can cool off. everybody can drink some eggnog and have some christmas cookies and sing some christmas carols and enjoy the company of loved ones. >> and then, congressman, just after he said that senator jeff sessions of alabama said this, and i shall quote, president obama today gave another speech about the fiscal cliff, no plan, nothing that can be scored or analyzed, just another spe
thing the next government needs to do is actually nothing. if it does nothing, if it doesn't reverse the reforms -- >> what's interesting is what berlusconi is campaigning on is austerity. he's running on an ant anti-austerity pro eu package. while it's untenable, it does have a certain amount of certainly backtracking the fiscal returns for them. >> exactly. this property tax, i think that's a cause for concern. if you were to repeal that, the fiscal position on would be unsustainable and he would have to raise taxes elsewhere to make up for that. that would be some messy negotiations with him on a european level. markets would be very concerned already heading into the elections. the more noise we hear, the higher italian borrowing costs would be and if italian borrowing costs rise, one of the very important parameters which led to this drop in debt to gdp over these 15 years heading into the crisis would not be fulfilled any more and italy's position would be unsustainable because of all that noise. >> it sounds like a catalyst should this fall into place in 2013. that still remai
geithner. it could delay the tax filings. the government relies on august revenue to come in and it usually comes flooding in during march and april. people need to pay their taxes, but they don't know which tax rules will apply. host: the other deadline is the debt limit. here at $16.4 trillion. guest: >> the treasury department can stop funding federal pensions and do some other maneuvers, essentially to buy them another six weeks of time. we all at this last year. closer they get to that is when financial markets will start going crazy. the debates we are having now about tax and spending will likely be the same debates we are having six weeks from now. host: there's the u.s. debt clock. you can also see how much that is for individuals and what protection is moving ahead. our guest is damian paletta of the wall street journal. the covers finances and congress and the white house. his work is available online. from the senate floor yesterday, these comments by the senate democratic leader harry reid. [video clip] >> the speakership all members of the house back to washington today. he sh
of these talks, whether it was about government shutdown in the spring of 2011 or the debt limit debate in the summer of 2011 or the payroll tax-cut debate last year, those negotiations started at a level between the president and speaker but always broke down at that level and that pushed to the senate where harry reid and mitch mcconnell had to figure something out and get enough votes for it so they could give some cover to the house republicans, who were joined by a large majority of house democrats to get something done. the idea that we have come to this state is not necessarily surprising. that it has taken us so long to get there has probably frustrated everyone who wanted to take a holiday break. if mitch mcconnell wants to play ball, and i think there's a role for him to do so. when you speak with aids from -- from his office, they say we will get involved, but we would like to see some good faith offer from the majority leader. -- with aides from his office. right now that process has not happened. as for for action today in the senate, it's not going to be anything where th
for anyone looking to become more familiar with how government works and the ins and outs of capitol hill. >> julie seger on c-span on verizon. c-span has been brought to you by your television provider as a public service. >> next, it is a global look at the economy with a speech by greek economist. among his many books, the economics professor recently minotaur" andobal natar we will show you as much as we can before the house gavels in at 2:00 p.m. eastern. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, france, -- friends, this is a singular honor to be a guest in this temple of civic life. thanks to all the good people for making this possible, to my publisher, the staff that are manning the barricades outside. my novel is debt crisis and the future of the world economy. i will be arguing that there is no such thing as a debt crisis. there is no debt crisis in the united states of america and europe, and there is no such thing as the debt crisis in my own country, which is nevertheless being consumed by debt. you know the joke about balloonist. the balloon has been blown off isrse, and at some p
" to postpone a government default. the government is on track to hit its borrowing limit on monday, he said with no prospect of congressional action to raise the limit. here now to help us unravel what's going on is todd zwillich. he's washington correspondent for "the takeaway" on public radio international. todd, welcome back. decode this for us. are the players privately as bleak about the prospects as their public statement suggests? >> not as bleak, margaret, but bleaker than they were even a week ago and that's not terribly encouraging. the president as you reported is flying back to washington last night and some members of congress are coming back earlier than others. there will be some meetings here, there have to be some meetings between the principals and the president. there are a couple of options in the last couple of days even though it seems like five days is terribly, terribly short. there shall bills floating out there to keep tax rates where they're at for people making $250,000 and below. that could slide around. there's a senate bill that floats around. there's the pres
overseas. that's right i heard me right. there are reports that syria may have used a separate government air strike that killed dozens of people waiting outside a bakery yesterday. they may have used chemical weapons for that. what may be more troubling is the report of seven others killed in an area currently controlled by the rebels when they inhaled an apparently poisonness gas sprayed by the syrian army. president obama had already declared that there is a red line regarding the use of chemical weapons on the syrian people. so now there are growing questions as to what if anything the u.s. cou should do if we are forced to respond. bob scales is a retired u.s. army major general and fnc military analyst. general, merry christmas, thanks for joining us. >> merry christmas to you too, jaime. jaime: you have to become more concerned about syria at this point. have they crossed the red line and should we respond. >> first of all let's be clear that most initial reports are wrong. it could be what is used is white phosphorus which is not a chemical weapon, when it's dropped from an aircra
this morning, saying the russian government's politically motivated decision will reduce adoption possibilities for children who are now under institutional care. were further concerned about statements that adoptions already under way may be stopped and hope that the russian government will allow those children who have already met and bonded with their future parents to finish the necessary legal procedures so that they can join their families. and as matthew said, there are just about 50 children that are in the pipeline right now. what senior state department officials are telling me is that they're hoping to get at least those through the pipeline, those children who have already met these parents to be able to be united with them, and then they'll work on trying to lift the whole ban, suzanne. >> elise, is there any kind of advice they're giving those families, those americans, who have already met with their potential children? what should they be doing now? >> reporter: well, right now all they can do, suzanne, is sit tight. they really -- the state department is working on these childr
that problem? >> all we have to do to balance the budget in 10 years limit the growth of government spending so that the budget climbs by an average 2.5% a year. in my mind, this isn't about the short term because whatever speed bump we go over we're going to go over. in the long run that is what i'm worried about, how big is government? how much of our economy's resources will be diverted and consumed by government? because i don't want to become greece or france or one of these stagnant slow growth welfare states. think evidence is very clear that fiscal policy does matter for an economy's performance. doesn't mean we have a recession if taxes go up but it does mean that government will be bigger and our growth rate in the long run maybe instead of 2.7, it is 2.6. that doesn't sound like much but because of compounding it adds up. adam: dan, i don't think there is any danger we become greece or france in a lot of ways. we're not a socialist country yet and greece is a whole different ball of wax. rich, the discussion about the economy, the spending cuts that they're talking about do put peopl
year's was in 1996. that is, of course, when they were dealing with the government shut down. politics will be put aside this morning. the president, a lot of members of congress will be attending that memorial service for the late senator. >> kristen welker in hawaii. we will check in with you again later in our show. >>> from the fiscal cliff to gun control nra executive vice president was on "meet the press" this morning and here is part of what he said. >> i don't understand why you can't just for a minute imagine that when that horrible monster tried to shoot his way into sandy hook school that if a good guy with a gun would have been there he might have been able to stop it. >> nbc news editor is with me in the studio. there were armed guards at columbine. >> we know the nra is going to dig in. nothing is going to change until the other side can show that it can win these kinds of arguments. we saw this with environmental regulations in the 70s. you saw this in the 90s with the assault weapons ban. i think a lot of democrats got spooked after the mid 90s because so many of them l
federal tax rates rising. government spending shrinking. and defending on details of your own situation, various tax breaks slipping away. in other words what we're calling the fiscal cliff. a plan to stop it all from happening still alludes washington, so congress has broken camp for the holidays and the president has gone to holiday on vacation. brianna keilar is out there for us in honolulu, eight days away from the fiscal cliff. are there any contacts occurring on this topic between the president and anyone in congress, briana? >> reporter: there is an open line of communication, i would say, with senate democrats, hala. but there is really no substantive conversations between the folks that you with need for there to be conversations between in order to strike a deal. the white house and congressional republicans, and perhaps more alarmingly, senate democrats are not in conversations right now with senate republicans or with house republicans. and this is problematic obviously because in order to avoid the fiscal cliff, you would need to find some sort of deal that would make it th
and oversight and government reform committee chairman tom davis. hello, gentlemen. nice to have you back. >> good morning. >> representative frost, we heard senator barroso there. does president obama want to go over the cliff? >> no, i don't believe that at all, alex. i've talked to people at a high level of the white house. they are concerned the effect this could have on the stock market, on our economy generally as well as the world markets. they don't want to go over the cliff. they've made a reasonable offer. they've moved to $400,000 as a cutoff, let everybody under that amount have their tax cuts. i feel sorry for speaker boehner who couldn't deliver his own party. if he'd been able to do that, at least somebody would have headed over to the senate and there could have been action. senate has to originate something. up to mitch mcconnell and harry reid to figure out something, send it back to the republicans in the house and hope enough will join democrat and vote for it. >> given the reasons for which mr. boehner was unable to deliver his own caucus in the house, do you think an
them and the government knew where they were because they were all registered were required to hand them in even the target shooting olympic team was not allowed to keep guns in the country and they had to practice and keep their guns abroad, but nonetheless, within the decade of guns being withdrawn from these people gun crime with handguns actually doubled and guns are really are awash on the streets and there's a fair amount of street crime using handguns which there hadn't been much of before, and it's beyond which was something that traditionally they never were. so it hasn't worked and what it has done and it's taken the guns away from the law-abiding people that might have used them to protect themselves or to do something else with legitimately. >> what do you say to people who look at united states and say, wow! random mass murderers -- i heard it today. random mass murders in the united states where some whacko killed a bunch of people he doesn't know seems to happen every six months in the united states and it doesn't happen as often in other places. are they wrong about
has, they won't have anymore, and they won't have the government assistance programs to rely on. may not have the same effect we saw in the last recession. >> the ultimate consumer discretionary stocks, it occurs to me, dana, would be the luxury retailers like a tiffany which have suffered here recently. they in the past have been immune to a lot of vagaries of the consumer and the economy, but that hasn't been the case this time around. what happened? >> i think tiffany's a little bit different than some of the other luxury goods company. tiffany overall is working on its product, silver business which is a high margin category. didn't have enough novelty and newness in it and hopefully that's something they can fix for next year. >> wasn't just me then? >> not just you. >> exactly. >> i noticed that, yeah. >> dana on that point, the companies for stocks like tiffany's, what about aptitude in places like china in. >> overall when we see what's happening in china, so many new brands emerged in china, new companies on the luxury good fronts, and you've had the big conglomerates vogue
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)